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What are Solutions?

In the context of the Solutions Gateway, Solutions are processes, or groups of actions, which Local Governments can implement to deliver climate change mitigation results and enhance local sustainable development. Taking an integrated approach, and focusing on Local Governments usual responsibilities and roles, Solutions include core actions as well as enabling and multiplying actions essential to maximize their effectiveness and efficiency. These include policy, regulatory, governance, capacity building, awareness raising, stakeholder engagement, etc.

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What are Case Studies?

In the context of the Solutions Gateway, case studies are examples of the implementation of Solutions and/or Solutions Packages by cities. These cases can include brief inspirational examples, as well as detailed examples supported by extensive quantitative data analysis.

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  • Water sector audit enables efficient use of water and energy resources in Nagpur (Nagpur, India)

    Identifying the water supply and distribution sector as a major area for potential improvements in both efficiency and scope, the Nagpur Municipal Corporation (NMC) began a comprehensive water sector efficiency program in 2005. The NMC started with an assessment of sector performance, hiring an external consultant to audit the water sector's performance and energy efficiency at five water treatment plants (WTPs) and two pumping stations. The NWC then implemented the auditor's recommendations for leak reduction and improvement of energy efficiency, partially through funds made available by the Indian Government's Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission. To ensure that the progress made through these initiatives would be continued, the NMC incorporated the findings of the audit into a water sector energy efficiency master plan. The NMC’s initiatives in the water sector contribute towards their commitment to reducing their energy consumption in municipal services. [Source: ICLEI case study series, n. 110]. Learn More...

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  • WATERGY Case Study (Emfuleni Municipality, South Africa)

    Due to relatively high pressures in Emfuleni's water network, many on-property plumbing fixtures fail prematurely, resulting in the loss of up to 80% of water flowing into the residential districts of Sebokeng and Evaton. Various socio-political and socio-economic factors cause most failed fixtures to remain in a state of disrepair over lengthy periods of time, sometimes years. In response, the Emfuleni Local Municipality has sent out a call for proposals to install an advanced pressure management system. Advanced pressure management would not only reduce and control high water pressure, but also allow pressure to be further reduced at night when full operating pressures are unnecessary due to low demand and minimal usage. The Sebokeng/Evaton pressure management project will be the biggest installation of its type when complete, and many of its technical, financial and contractual components will find application elsewhere in South Africa and around the world. [Source: WATERGY project, Alliance to Save Energy] . Learn More...

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  • Waste-to-energy in Denmark: The most efficient waste management system in Europe (Denmark)

    At the end of 2005, Denmark had 29 waste-to-energy facilities that treated a total of 3.5 million tonnes of waste, which corresponds to roughly 26% of the total waste generated in Denmark. Environmentally friendly and partially renewable energy are produced from this waste in the form of electricity and heat (district heating network). Existing legislation on environmental protection, heat, and electricity supply ensures favorable framework conditions for waste incineration in Denmark. [Source: RenoSam and Rambøll 2006]. Learn More...

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  • Using solar energy - supporting community energy self-sufficiency (Barcelona, Spain)

    Barcelona was the first European city to implement a Solar Thermal Ordinance, giving an example that has been followed by more than 70 cities in Spain alone. More than promoting renewable energy, this is part of the city's strategy to achieve energy self-sufficiency. [Source: ICLEI case studies series, n. 173]. Learn More...

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  • Pioneering renewable energy and energy efficiency application in India’s municipal health sector (Bhubaneswar, India)

    The Bhubaneswar Municipal Hospital (BMH), owned and operated by the Bhubaneswar Municipal Corporation (BMC), mainly serves the low income population of Bhubaneswar. Services were frequently interrupted by an erratic power supply and resources were not available to make improvements. Identifying a unique solution to these issues, the BMH became the first municipal hospital in India to implement renewable energy and energy efficiency measures. This resulted in substantial energy savings while enabling an improved, more efficient delivery of health services. [Source: ICLEI case study series n. 108]. Learn More...

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  • Showcase Production of Hydrocarbon Room Air-Conditioning Systems (China)

    Room air-conditioning systems in China contain hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) as refrigerant gas. This is the main source of ozone- and climate-damaging HCFC emissions in China which totals 260 million tonnes of CO2-equivalent emissions per year. The airconditioning sector is a fast growing sector in China and alternative, environment-friendly technologies are urgently needed to reduce negative climate impacts. Conversion to the use of hydrocarbons as refrigerants would not only cut greenhouse gas emissions but also achieve energy savings compared with conventional technology. It is also intended to minimise the need to switch from HCFCs to HFCs (e.g. R-410A), which have an even higher climate impact than the currently used HCFCs. [Source: Programme Proklima, GIZ]. Learn More...

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  • Ecomobility Shift Case Study (City of Lund, Sweden)

    The City of Lund agreed to participate in an assessment and external audit by EcoMobility SHIFT to determine the sustainability of the city’s current transport systems. [Source: EcoMobility SHIFT project] . Learn More...

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  • Water saving by water consumption control (Hamburg, Germany)

    Since the mid-1980s water saving policy has had get a high priority on the agenda of the Hamburg water company. The benefits of efficient use of drinking water in households has been promoted mainly by the introduction of water meters for dwellings. It has been demonstrated that potential savings in water consumption can amount to 15 % on average with conventional water metering devices and up to 25 % if the new meter is supplemented with additional water saving devices. [Source: "Hamburg: Water saving by water consumption control", SURBAN - database on sustainable urban development in Europe, 1998]. Learn More...

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  • Paper Recycling and Composting Project (Mutare, Zimbabwe)

    A Paper Recycling and Composting Project enabled the Municipality of Mutare to decrease the amount of waste being disposed of, while creating employment opportunities and contributing to poverty alleviation. [Source: ICLEI case studies series n. 65]. Learn More...

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  • Comprehensive and Integrated approach to Waste Management (Edmonton, Canada)

    The implementation of the waste management strategy of the City of Edmonton, with the engagement of the community and the private sector, resulted in diversion of approximately 70 % of its residential waste from landfill. [Source: ICLEI case study series, n. 71]. Learn More...

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  • Transit Oriented Development NAMA in Colombia (Colombia)

    Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action (NAMA) for transformational urban development linking transport and land-use planning at the local level. Already a leader in implementing Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) systems, Colombia is now taking a more holistic approach to tackle traffic and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through coordination of transport systems and land-use planning, integration with housing policy and inter-institutional cooperation which includes sub-national governments and the private sector. From March 2015 to 2019, the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) NAMA will focus public and private investment around transit stations and corridors. It will result in more compact development through high-density, mixed land use and human-scale design, locating facilities within walking distance of transit stations. Key features of this program includes: high-quality public spaces; variety of housing types and prices; frequent, reliable, fast and comfortable transit; and measures discouraging the use of private cars. The TOD NAMA is expected to reduce growth in motor-vehicle use by 25% and mitigate 3.6 to 5.4 MMt CO2eq annually, by 2040, due to changes in land use and travel patterns. [Source: V-NAMA project, Colombia Case Study]. Learn More...

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  • WATERGY Case Study (Veracruz, Mexico)

    The Metropolitan System of Water and Sanitation at Veracruz (SAS), the water utility in Veracruz, Mexico, was motivated to undertake significant steps to become more energy efficient for two reasons: one is that energy costs ranked second in total operating costs, and the other is that their service was sporadic with severe interruptions a common occurrence. The system serves 628,000 users, and provides water and sanitation in the municipalities of Veracruz, Boca del Rió and Medellín in the state of Veracruz. [Source: WATERGY project, Alliance to Save Energy, 2005]. Learn More...

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  • Waste Management V-NAMA in Indonesia (Indonesia)

    Development of Vertically integrated Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action (V-NAMA) in the municipal solid waste management sector in Indonesia. Taken place from May 2012 to April 2015, the government of Indonesia partnered with GIZ in the project “V-NAMAs – Vertically integrated NAMAs” for developing a vertically integrated approach to mitigate GHG emission in the Municipal Solid Waste Management Sector in the country by applying financing mechanisms for infrastructure investments and operations. The program comprises of the construction of sanitary landfills in five municipalities, four of which to co-exist in parallel with composting facilities, landfill gas extraction and flaring and leachate collection and treatment facilities. The selected locations are: Jambi municipality in Jambi province; Kendari municipality in South East Sulawesi province; Malang municipality in East Java province; Pekalongan municipality and regency in Central Java province; Sidoarjo district in East Java province. Out of the overall investment budget of approximately €100 million, KfW provides on behalf of the German government an interest reduced loan of €75 million; SECO finances accompanying measures including capacity building for municipalities in the amount of € 7.6 million. [Source: V-NAMA project Case Study]. Learn More...

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  • Building Energy Efficiency V-NAMA in South Africa (South Africa)

    Development of vertically integrated Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action (V-NAMA) to improve energy efficiency of public buildings in South Africa. Control over building codes and energy efficiency standards is an area where municipalities around the world generally have a high degree of influence. The South African Energy Efficiency and Energy Demand Management Flagship Programme has taken place from May 2012 to April 2015, engaging three national government departments, four provinces and nine municipalities. It focusses on energy efficiency, spanning industry, commercial and residential public buildings. Within this program a sample of about 260 public buildings was selected for the installation of smart meters, 80 of these being provincial and municipal buildings. 87 building managers and other officials from the participating provinces and municipalities conducted building energy audits and set energy consumption baselines for government buildings (two provincial and two municipal buildings in each pilot-province), with support from experts of an Energy Service Company (ESCo). The estimated energy savings for individual measures in pre-selected public buildings with focus on lighting, air conditioning, water heating and behavioural change amounted to 20-30%. (Theoretical) pay-back periods for these measures amounted to 0.3-3 years. Shared-savings energy contracts are being tested in two selected municipalities, etekwini (KwaZulu-Natal province) and Graaf-Reinet in Cacadu district municipality (Eastern Cape province). [Source: V-NAMA project Case Study]. Learn More...

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  • Durban Landfill - Gas to Electricity Project (Durban, South Africa)

    In 2003 the World Bank initiated an assessment in South Africa to identify sound environmental projects to invest in. One of the projects they selected was to cooperate with DSW in the establishment of the Durban Landfill Gas to Electricity Project (LG2EP), to seize this local renewable energy resource. Over the 2003 to 2010 period DSW worked with a range of local and international stakeholders to develop and operationalise the LG2EP. Currently, the Mariannhill and Bisasar landfills form the first landfill gas-to-electricity project in Africa. The project is also the second registered Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) project in South Africa. [Source: Project Summary Document, eThekwini Municipality]. Learn More...

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  • Introducing climate-friendly commercial air conditioning (Indonesia)

    In a public-private partnership together with the Indonesian company AICOOL, different types of systems for refrigeration and air conditioning purposes are being redesigned and optimised for the use of natural refrigerants, primarily R290 (propane). Based on optimised design and tailor-made equipment the new cooling aggregates will be installed at a client’s hotel in Bali, Indonesia. Due to its outstanding physical properties this refrigerant is best suitable for hot climates and allows a substantial reduction of raw materials to be used for production. At the same time the optimised products show significantly better energy efficiency of about 15%. The successful project will be on display during the 23rd Meeting of the Parties to the Montreal Protocol in Bali, Indonesia from 21-25 November 2011. [Source: Programme Proklima, GIZ]. Learn More...

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  • Demonstration project for the conversion of production facilities for the manufacturing of split and window-type air-conditioning (India)

    The project aims to introduce R290 split and window type driven room air-conditioners into the Indian market. The main goal is to transfer know-how and to develop human, entrepreneurial and institutional capabilities for the hydrocarbon based application of air-conditioning and refrigeration technologies. [Source: Programme Proklima, GIZ]. Learn More...

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  • WATERGY Case Study (Soweto, South Africa)

    The supply of water to Soweto is characterized by unsustainably high wastage. Water pumped to the region averages around 67 kilolitres (kL) per property per month which—prior to the implementation of the intervention project described in this case study—was increasing at a rate of 4% per annum. Where the project has been implemented, consumptions average only 10 kL per property per month. This scenario is repeated throughout South Africa and is not sustainable either environmentally—since South Africa is a water scarce country—or financially, since most of the costs incurred by the municipality in delivering services are not reimbursed due to non-payment. [Source: WATERGY project, Alliance to Save Energy] . Learn More...

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  • Ecomobility Shift Case Study (City of Dundee, UK)

    The City of Dundee agreed to participate in an assessment and external audit by EcoMobility SHIFT to determine the sustainability of the city’s current transport systems. [Source: EcoMobility SHIFT project] . Learn More...

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  • Headquarters of the District Authority of Weiz, Austria (Weiz, Austria)

    The headquarters of the District Authority of Weiz is located in an office building constructed in 1964. Due to new requirements concerning function, fire protection and energy demand, a comprehensive renovation has been carried out. Renovation measures include a new innovative façade system, mechanical night cooling with the existing air conditioning system and a circulating heat exchanger based on air. Following renovation the building is planned to achieve a very high energy standard. After the renovation (end of June 2011) detailed energy monitoring will be carried out to evaluate planned renovation measures. Expected results include 80% reduction in annual heating energy demand per m2 gross floor area and 80% reduction in CO2e emissions per m2 gross floor area [Source: SCI-Network, Sustainable Construction and Innovation through Procurement, 2011]. Learn More...

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  • Ecomobility Shift Case Study (City of Turnhout, Belgium)

    The City of Turnhout agreed to participate in an assessment and external audit by EcoMobility SHIFT to determine the sustainability of the city’s current transport systems. [Source: EcoMobility SHIFT project] . Learn More...

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  • Ecomobility Shift Case Study (City of Oss, Netherlands)

    The City of Oss agreed to participate in an assessment and external audit by EcoMobility SHIFT to determine the sustainability of the city’s current transport systems. [Source: EcoMobility SHIFT project] . Learn More...

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  • ​Residential heating with biogas (Koeln, Germany)

    One of the largest sewage treatment plants in Germany (Großklärwerk Stammheim) is now supplying biogas that is used to cover the district heating needs of a residential area nearby, thanks to a joint project, initiated in 2010, that involved the municipal water company, the energy utility and a private real estate owner. On average, the required heat is supplied about 80 % from sewage gas. The rest is generated by natural gas backup-boiler to compensate for seasonal variations in the digester gas and peak-demand. The new, innovative concept lead to a saving of 4,100 tonnes of CO2 per year and a cost reduction for the residents by 17 %. [Source: Project “Celsius, Smart Cities” funded by the European Union] . Learn More...

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  • Ecomobility Shift Case Study (City of Miskolc, Hungary)

    The City of Miskolc agreed to participate in an assessment and external audit by EcoMobility SHIFT to determine the sustainability of the city’s current transport systems. [Source: EcoMobility SHIFT project] . Learn More...

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  • Ecomobility Shift Case Study (City of Burgas, Bulgaria)

    The City of Burgas agreed to participate in an assessment and external audit by EcoMobility SHIFT to determine the sustainability of the city’s current transport systems. [Source: EcoMobility SHIFT project] . Learn More...

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  • Low Emissions Schools NAMA in Mexico (Mexico)

    Scaling-up a local climate change education programme into a Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action (NAMA). The Low Emissions Schools Programme is a NAMA focused on the educational sector in Mexico. Starting from June 2013 up to 2018, it engaged schoolchildren aged between 10 and 16 to learn about reducing greenhouse gases in their schools and to make more efficient use of resources. As a consequence the schools have begun to significantly reduce their emissions as well as cutting costs. At the same time, the children and young people also transfer this knowledge to their families, friends and communities facilitating wider awareness raising and behavior change across the community. The estimated level of funding required to implement the NAMA is $62.77m USD for an implementation period of 6 years. During this time it is envisaged to scale the project from its implementation in 5 states and 36 schools up to 18 states and 10,000 schools, covering approximately 5% of the sector. [Source: V-NAMA project, Mexico Case Study]. Learn More...

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  • Green Roof Bylaw: institutional coordination to enable the greening of the city from above (Toronto, Canada)

    Toronto is the first North American city to mandate the construction of green roofs new commercial, institutional and residential developments with a minimum gross floor area of 2000m2. In 2011, one and a half years after the Bylaw’s implementation Toronto had benefited from 113,300m2 of new green space, a 12,300m3 reduction in stormwater runoff, 1.5 million kWh savings for building owners and the creation of 125 new jobs. Additional metropolitan benefits from green space cultivation include the preservation of biodiversity, improved water and air quality, and reduction in the urban heat island effect. [Source: Urban NEXUS Case Story 2014 – n.11]. Learn More...

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  • An example of an integrated transportation system (Boulder, USA)

    Boulder, Colorado has been tremendously successful in integrating biking, walking, and public transit. Boulder residents ride public transit at twice the rate of the national U.S. average, walk more than three times as often, and ride bikes 21 times more that the national average. The Transportation Department is tracking the success of transportation planning in Boulder. Based on an analysis from 2011, transit users in Boulder have increased 300% since 1991, while Single Vehicle Occupancy has declined 15%. [Source: ICLEI Case Study n. 164]. Learn More...

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  • Embedded energy generation experience in a South African metropolitan municipality (Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, South Africa)

    Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality is a leader in small-scale embedded energy generation in South Africa. From the outset, the Municipality has opted to focus on the contribution that small-scale embedded renewable energy generation can make towards achieving key constitutional mandates such as economic growth and development, sustainable service delivery, and ensuring a safe and healthy environment.. Learn More...

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  • WATERGY Case Study (Pune, India)

    Indian municipalities continue to face the challenges of a growing population, urban expansion, increasing power tariffs and acute water shortages. At present, only about 2/3 of the urban population has direct access to clean, affordable, reliable drinking water. At the same time, municipal water utilities in India spend upward of 60% of their budget on energy for water pumping. The Alliance to Save Energy has found that savings of at least 20% are typically available from no- and low-cost efficiency measures made in municipal water utilities, with much more possible with higher cost measures. [Source: WATERGY project, Alliance to Save Energy] . Learn More...

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  • WATERGY Case Study (Vishakhapatnam, India)

    Indian municipalities are facing the challenges of rapid urban expansion, increasing power tariffs, and acute water shortages. At present only about two thirds of the urban population has direct access to clean, affordable and reliable drinking water services. At the same time, municipal water utilities in India spend upwards of 60 percent of their budgets on energy used for water pumping. Municipal officials are often aware of the opportunities for making bulk water supply and street lighting systems more efficient. However, for the most part they lack the means to take advantage of these opportunities. [Source: WATERGY project, Alliance to Save Energy] . Learn More...

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  • Reducing water demand and establishing a water saving culture in the City of Zaragoza (Zaragoza, Spain)

    Faced with severe water shortages, an expanding population and deteriorating water infrastructure, the city of Zaragoza has responded by embarking on an ambitious water conservation programme with the aim of establishing a ‘water saving culture’ among businesses, industry and the local population. By mobilising key stakeholders and residents, the city has succeeded in significantly reducing its water consumption despite continued population growth and an expanding economy. [Source: SWITCH Training Kit, CLEI European Secretariat, 2011]. Learn More...

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  • Saving Water and Energy (Gugulethu, South Africa)

    As part of the Increasing Sustainable Local Government Services (ISLGS) program of USAID/South Africa, the Alliance to Save Energy has provided technical assistance to the City of Cape Town for the installation and commissioning of pressure management equipment aimed at alleviating excessive supply in areas such as Gugulethu. Although a basic pressure-reducing valve had been installed in the main supply line to the area of Gugulethu a number of years ago, opportunity to substantially improve the efficiency of this valve in reducing night flows resulting in water wastage has been identified. [Source: WATERGY project, Alliance to Save Energy]. Learn More...

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  • Using natural systems for groundwater conservation: mineral water from the tap (Kumamoto, Japan)

    Kumamoto City presents a good example for protecting and making effective use of the existing natural environment to provide quality public services. The city is endowed with high-quality groundwater. Among Japanese cities with a population of 700,000 or more, Kumamoto is the only city where almost all of its water supply is from groundwater - rare even worldwide. Kumamoto City adopted the “Declaration of the Groundwater Preservation City” in 1976, and has since made a continuous effort to conserve groundwater. It has also pro-actively worked with neighboring municipalities to conserve water. [Source: ICLEI case study series, n. 136]. Learn More...

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  • Waste to Energy: treatment of residual waste (Vienna, Austria)

    The City of Vienna is not only responsi­ble for the entire chain of waste disposal, but also handles the processing of residual waste independently. With this mandate, the municipal administration has accordingly taken measures to dispose of the city’s waste in an ecologi­cally sustainable manner while simultaneously generating clean and partially renewable energy from waste: electricity, district heating and, for the past few years, even district cooling. [Source: City of Vienna]. Learn More...

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  • Energy from Waste (Amsterdam, Netherlands)

    Powerpoint detailing the development and advantages of Amsterdam's waste-to-energy plant, operational since 1993, and waste-fired power plant, operational since 2007, seizing Municipal Solid Waste as a partially renewable energy resource. [Source: Simoes, Afval Energie Bedrijf, 2013]. Learn More...

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  • Turning pollution into profit: the Bandeirantes Landfill Gas to Energy Project (São Paulo, Brazil)

    The “Bandeirantes Landfill Gas to Energy Project” (BLFGE) was developed by the City of São Paulo to collect and process biogas from the Bandeirantes Landfill to generate electricity at an on-site power plant. BLFGE was developed in response to a pressing environmental issue that posed a health risk to the local population and needlessly contributed to climate change. It is estimated that the project will prevent the release of more than 7,400,000 tons of CO² into the atmosphere between 2004 and 2010, while producing clean energy, generating of additional revenue streams, increasing awareness of climate change and renewable energy in the community, and creating jobs. [Source: ICLEI case study series, n. 107]. Learn More...

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  • Portuguese tax to focus regeneration and increase transparency of development costs (Tomar, Portugal)

    A study has evaluated the Municipal Urbanisation Tax (MUT) - a specific tax for the construction, maintenance, and reinforcement of urban infrastructure - in the city of Tomar, Portugal. This is a one-time charge applied to new development through land subdivision (Loteamento) or individual buildings, similar to an impact fee, and has a new, simplifed formula which reinforces efforts to contain urban sprawl. Other municipalities aiming to direct urban regeneration towards their brownfield sites, for example, could learn from this experience. [Source: "Science for Environment Policy": European Commission DG Environment News Alert Service, edited by SCU, The University of the West of England, Bristol]. Learn More...

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  • City of Vancouver Landfill Gas Recovery System (City of Vancouver, Canada)

    The City of Vancouver owns and operates a large municipal solid waste facility. Since 2003, the City has been piping a portion of the landfill gas - a local renewable energy resources - to a nearby cogeneration facility, where it is used to generate both electricity and heat. The electricity is sold to BC Hydro, and is used to power 7,000 homes. The heat is used to warm several nearby greenhouses, and the Landfill Administration buildings, through district heating. The project eliminates more than 250,000 tonnes in annual GHG emissions and reduces odours. In addition it also generates considerable revenue. The City currently earns $400,000 annually through an agreement with MAXIM Power. [Source: Partners for Climate Protection National Measures Report 2010, page 21]. Learn More...

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  • Green Cleaning in the City of Reykjavik (Reykjavik, Iceland)

    The City of Reykjavík has decided to green its cleaning. This involves a reduction in the overall quantity of cleaning chemicals used per m² cleaned, and ensuring that those which are used are less harmful to the environment and human health. Reykjavík's Green Cleaning Program aims to ensure that public cleaning contracts are fulfilled in a way which minimizes adverse environmental and human health impacts. Green cleaning is a good example of how local authorities can increase sustainability and simultaneously lower public spending. In two pilot projects, the city included environmental criteria in two tenders for cleaning services. The cleaning costs were cut in half while the market share for ecolabelled cleaning services in Iceland increased substantially. [Source: ICLEI case study series, n. 146]. Learn More...

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  • Energy saving measures at waste water treatment plant (Tirgu Mures, Romania)

    The main objective of the project was to implement energy saving measures through the transfer of Netherlands knowledge, experience at the municipal waste water treatment plant (WWTP) of Tirgu Mures, train managerial and operational staff of RA Aquaserv public utility company in effective and efficient management of the treatment works. The project result was a fully operational combined heat and power unit working on the biogas generated in the waste water treatment process. Results include: 1.278 MWh of renewable electricity produced and 102 K Euro of economic benefits. [Source: Aquaserv, in ManagEnergy portal] . Learn More...

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  • Achieving energy-efficiency through the Hamburg Water Cycle in the Jenfelder Au eco-neighborhood (Hamburg, Germany)

    The housing district uses the energy-related potential of wastewater to achieve greater resource efficiency through an integrated approach to the urban water cycle. With the new system, wastewater from toilets (black water) is diverted to a biogas plant to be converted into biogas. Biogas is then converted to electricity, used to heat the neighborhood, in a completely CO2-free process. Simultaneously, grey water is separately treated for re-use for gardening or toilet flushing. Lastly, rainwater is also included in the system through decentralized rainwater management to be used for watering the lawns. The separation of grey and black water and promotion of onsite green area lessens the stress placed on stormwater infrastructure, in turn reducing the risk of flooding while increasing the neighborhood’s resilience to climate change. [Source: Urban NEXUS Case Story 2014 – n.24]. Learn More...

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  • WATERGY Case Study (Fortaleza, Brazil)

    The Alliance to Save Energy has worked alongside the Companhia de Água e Esgoto do Ceara (CAGECE) in the Northeast of Brazil since 2001 in order to develop and implement measures for more efficient use of water and energy. This partnership aimed to improve the distribution of water and the access to sanitation services, while reducing operational costs and environmental impacts. The partnership was important not only for reducing energy use at CAGECE, but also for establishing an example for similar projects nationwide, since the water and sanitation sector represents some 2.3% of Brazil’s energy consumption. [Source: WATERGY project, Alliance to Save Energy] . Learn More...

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  • Sustainable Urban Mobility: The Example of Istanbul (Istanbul, Turkey)

    Istanbul faces immense challenges as it tries to accommodate a rate of increase in personal motor vehicles greater than its rate of population growth. This GIZ survey aims to identify the main transport problems of Istanbul and outline a suitable transport system, urban planning and implementation strategies, structural measures, technical features, economic instruments, and institutional framework in order to work towards sustainability in Istanbul’s urban transport. [Source: Sustainable Urban Transport Project, GIZ]. Learn More...

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  • Purchasing energy-efficient outdoor lighting in Cascais (Cascais, Portugal)

    In 2005, energy consumption for public lighting in the municipality of Cascais represented 79% of total electricity consumed by the local government (for public infrastructure).Cascais’ Local Energy Agency reformed the criteria used to purchase public lighting technology. Then, the Municipality of Cascais undertook a market engagement process, which saw 11 LED suppliers participating in one-to-one meetings with representatives from the Environment and Procurement departments and from the Local Energy Agency. Participating suppliers detailed environmentally friendly product characteristics and the opportunities available for increased sustainable product innovation.The tender is in the process of being launched and has a total contract value of 50,000 Euros. [Source: Cascais Energy Agency, in European Commission's Green Public Procurement news alert] . Learn More...

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  • Green Public Procurement: A collection of good practices (Europe)

    A brochure containing a selection of sustainable procurement practices from across the European Union.Focusing on 12 case studies, the brochure is intended to inspire public (and private) procurers to opt for green products and services when making their purchasing decisions. [Source: European Commission, 2012]. Learn More...

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  • Green Public Procurement in Practice (Europe)

    Since January 2010, the European Commission has collected examples of Green Public Procurement (GPP) in practice to illustrate how European public authorities have successfully launched `green` tenders, and provide guidance for others who wish to do the same. There are now over 90 examples now available. [Source: European Commission]. Learn More...

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  • Vienna’s Sustainable New Hospital (Vienna, Austria)

    The Vienna North Hospital is planned as a main hospital in north-east Vienna with 800 beds. The project was launched in Spring 2006 through a European call for tender for cooperation partners and plans. A Sustainability Charter has been developed for the project, setting out the detailed criteria to be included in each stage of the hospital’s planning and building. This draws upon a workshop held with experts and the project team, and a number of established green building standards. The preliminary draft phase of the planning has now been completed, with construction due to begin in 2012. [Source: Vienna Hospital Association, in European Commission's Green Public Procurement case study series, n. 6]. Learn More...

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  • Framework contract for green IT equipment in Gipuzkoa (Gipuzkoa, Spain)

    In 2008, a public tendering process for a three year framework contract for the supply of office IT equipment for Gipuzkoa’s Provincial Council and other autonomous or public bodies based in the province took place. Three companies were selected to supply 450 desktop computers, 300 monitors, 20 laptops, 20 light laptops, and accessories. To prepare the tender, Gipuzkoa’s Provincial Council used the GPP criteria developed by the Basque Environmental Management Authority of the Basque Government (ihobe), which are in line with the common EU GPP criteria for office IT equipment. [Source: Gipuzkoa Provincial Council, in European Commission's Green Public Procurement news alerts] . Learn More...

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  • Municipal Solid Waste Treatment: Case Study of Public–PrivatePartnerships (PPPs) in Wenzhou (Wenzhou, China)

    Wenzhou's refuse incinerator power generation plant is the result of a public-private partnership in China's municipal solid waste (MSW) sector. The municipality formed a partnership with Wei Ming Environmental Protection Engineering to build and operate a new MSW-to-energy incinerator plant, and seize this partially-renewable energy resource. Wei Ming would invest a total of CNY90 million to build the plant and would operate, manage, and maintain it for 25 years (excluding a 2-year construction period) under the agreement. At the end of the period, the plant would revert to government ownership without any additional compensation to the company. [Source: ADB, 2010]. Learn More...

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  • Biogas from food waste collection into National Grid (Milton Keynes, UK)

    Milton Keynes, one of the first local authorities in the United Kingdom (UK) to implement a waste recycling collection, has signed a contract with Renewable Power Systems to divert food and green waste from landfill and produce biogas to be fed into the national gas grid. The process of identifying appropriate options and running trials was a solid start to a new approach with multiple energy and environmental benefits by seizing this local renewable energy resource. [Source: ACR+, in LG Action]. Learn More...

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  • Use of leakage control in water management strategy (Malta)

    The Maltese islands experience acute water shortage as an area. To address this, leakage control has been developed to become a strategically important component for water resource management, and has been used to reach an optimum economic balance between water supply and water demand. The key lesson is that leakage management is an effective supply side action to increase efficiency in water use leading, and can be used as a strategic tool. [Source: Malta Water Services Corporation, in Global Water Partnership]. Learn More...

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  • Baltic GPP Success Stories (Europe)

    A selection of over 20 sustainable procurement case stories from around the Baltic Region. Available in several languages: Danish, English, Finnish, German, and Norwegian. [Source: Baltic Green Public Procurement]. Learn More...

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  • Portland transit development: Urban development centered on public transport (Portland, USA)

    Making "cities for people not cars" by instituting - at the city level - both regional planning and governance for land use and transport, and protecting a dense and lively urban center. Early initiatives provided a framework that for several decades has produced sustainable urbanisation achievements. [Source: WWF]. Learn More...

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  • Transit-Oriented for All: The Case for Mixed-Income Transit-Oriented Communities in the Bay Area (San Mateo Bay Meadows and Fruitvale Transit Village, USA)

    Two case studies were developed as a result of an initiative, set forward by several nonprofit organizations and a University, whose goal is for half of the new homes built in the Bay Area between 2007 and 2030 to be located in walkable neighborhoods near transit: 1) San Mateo Bay Meadows (pages 27 - 33) and 2) Fruitvale Transit Village (pages 33 - 40). [Source: University of California Berkeley's Center for Community Innovation, 2007]. Learn More...

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  • Financing bundled municipal energy efficiency projects through energy performance contracts by energy service companies (Tamil Nadu, India)

    Tamil Nadu Urban Infrastructure Financial Services Limited (TNUIFSL) launched a municipal energy efficiency project in 45 towns in 2007. With REEEP support, the Alliance to Save Energy has provided technical advisory services to TNUIFSL for undertaking this project. For the first time, municipalities have been ‘bundled’ for implementation of energy efficiency in water pumping and street lighting by energy service companies (ESCOs) through energy performance contracts (EPCs). [Source: Alliance to Save Energy]. Learn More...

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  • Kuninkaantammi residential district is the Pilot of the Helsinki Storm Water Strategy (Helsinki, Finland)

    This residential district in northwestern Helsinki is the pilot test of the Helsinki’s storm water strategy introduced in 2008. Cost comparisons made of the storm water management options indicate that the natural method of storm water management will be up to three times more economical to implement than the traditional pipe methods. [Source: City of Helsinki, in Climate-Proof City – The Planner’s Workbook]. Learn More...

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  • Clayton South Wetlands (Kingston, Australia)

    Capturing the multiple benefits of SUDS: upgrading an existing retarding basin to a recreational place in Clayton South Wetlands, Melbourne, Australia [Source: case study developed by Clearwater, Australia, 2013] . Learn More...

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  • Helping to keep the Mona Lisa smiling (Paris, France)

    An infosheet detailing how 50% of Parisian energy needs are now met by 3 waste-to-energy plants (Municipal Solid Waste is a local and partially renewable energy resource) [Source: CEWEP]. Learn More...

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  • Lamb Drove: demonstrating SUDS for new residential areas (Cambourne, UK)

    Lamb Drove is a residential development of 35 affordable homes on a one hectare site. The aim of the Lamb Drove SUDS scheme was to showcase practical and innovative sustainable water management techniques within new residential developments. The project, initiated by the Cambridgeshire County Council, intended to demonstrate that SUDS were a viable and attractive alternative to more traditional forms of drainage and to deliver practical solutions for new housing areas. [Source: Case study compiled by susdrain, United Kingdom, 2013]. Learn More...

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  • Waste to energy for more effective landfill site management (Belo Horizonte, Brazil)

    A landfill site in Belo Horizonte, operational for 32 years, was once the largest single source of greenhouse gas emissions in the city. However, greenhouse gases from the landfill site have been reduced substantially and since its closure in 2007, the Municipal Waste Treatment Centre has made it into a waste-to-energy facility to seize this local renewable energy resource. The landfill capture and power generation facility have been fully operational since 2010. [Source: IRENA] . Learn More...

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  • A Sustainable library for Strathfield (Strathfield, Australia)

    Case study compiled by: Water Sensitive Urban Design Program. The Strathfield Council initiated a SUDS demonstration in its newly built City Library with the aim to: provide a case study for Council staff and the local community to learn about using rainwater tanks and reducing our water consumption; to reduce potable water demand of the Library; to reduce storm water discharges from the library; to test the feasibility of refining Councils rainwater tank policy and; to build an energy efficient, comfortable and functional building. [Source: Strathfield Municipal Council, in Water Sensitive Design Program]. Learn More...

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  • Seattle, Washington: Incorporating Water Quality Features into the Right-of-Way (Seattle, USA)

    The Seattle Public Utilities (SPU) have been successful in creating a presentable package that met the interests of policy makers, regulators, and citizens. SPU projected that NDS installations are at least 25 percent less expensive than traditional storm water systems due to decreased build and infrastructure maintenance costs. The SUDS have generated a broad public appeal and may even increase the property value of retrofitted neighbourhoods. [Source: Sustainable Storm Water Best Management Practices, Water Environment Research Foundation, 2009]. Learn More...

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  • Portland case study in Green infrastructure case studies: Municipal policies for managing stormwater with Green Infrastructure (Portland, USA)

    Drastic reduction in capital expenses via SUDS: Portland’s experience in investing $ 9 million to save $224 million in hard infrastructure. It has a mature and comprehensive green infrastructure programs with multiple overlapping policies and programs that have seen several successful implementations over time. [Source: "Green infrastructure case studies: Municipal policies for managing stormwater with Green Infrastructure", USEPA, 2010, pages 53 - 55]. Learn More...

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  • Chicago case study in Green Infrastructure Case Studies: Municipal Policies for Managing Stormwater with Green Infrastructure (Chicago, USA)

    Chicago suffered a series of problems such as floods as a result of aging combined sewage infrastructures and urban heat island effect. The program resulted in 600,000 trees added to the city`s tree canopy and more than 400 million square feet of green roofs had been installed on 300 buildings by 2010. Urban green infrastructures improved the air quality and enhance the pedestrian environment. Research indicated that, green roof not only reduces storm water runoff by 50% but saved 5,500 USD energy expenses for heating and cooling of buildings. [Source: "Green Infrastructure Case Studies: Municipal Policies for Managing Stormwater with Green Infrastructure", USEPA, 2010, pages 37 - 39] . Learn More...

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  • Augustenborg, Malmö: Retrofitting SUDS in an urban regeneration area (Malmö, Sweden)

    The neighbourhood of Augustenborg experienced socio-economic decline in recent decades and frequently suffered from floods caused by overflowing drainage systems. The district underwent a significant regeneration between 1998 and 2002. A new stormwater management system based on the principles of SUDS was implemented. The project covered residential, commercial, industrial area as well as schools in its scope. Results: the open stormwater system now retains 70% of all rainwater. The green roofs installed in the building reduce rainwater runoff by 50%, enhance biodiversity, add a cooling effect during summer months and help in noise reduction. The green spaces created by the wetlands provide social and ecological benefits and have increased local biodiversity by 50%. The environmental improvements and the empowerment of the local community has resulted in Augustenborg becoming a financial attractive, multicultural and sustainable neighbourhood. [Source: GRABS project, University of Manchester] . Learn More...

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  • The Integrated Water Harvesting Project for food security and income generation (Ehlanzeni, South Africa)

    Ehlanzeni district has a high unemployment rate of 76% and four out of five people live below the government’s official poverty line on less than $US 60 cents per day. Simultaneously, Ehlanzeni is faced with significant resource strains. Water was identified as the main factor limiting local food production, the expansion of small-scale enterprise, employment and other entrepreneurial activities that could increase income. A partnership was formed between six community groups comprised of 100 people, including the local NGO, government, research institutions and civil society, to develop an Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) project. The multi-stakeholder IWRM project is expected to deploy rainwater harvesting infrastructure, build community capacity to boost food security and income generation (with an annual average return of $US 1855 per hectare) while empowering the women, men and youth involved. [Source: Urban NEXUS Case Story 2014 – n.12]. Learn More...

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  • Good practice projects for biogas production from waste, upgrading and utilization (Europe)

    A selection of profiles on various biogas production initiatives across the European Union, sharing good practices and lessons learnt in seizing different types of organic wastes as local renewable energy resources. [Source: Urban Biogas project, Fraunhofer IWES]. Learn More...

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  • Mercado del Trueque: how Mexico City is turning trash into food (Mexico City, Mexico)

    By allowing residents to exchange their recyclable ‘waste’ such as paper and glass for food vouchers, the City of Mexico addresses waste management and food security concerns, while stimulating a market for fresh produce from local farmers. With over 2,000 people attending the market each month, in 2012, the market collected more than 173 tons of recyclable waste. Consumers collect a maximum of ten kilos of recyclable waste and receive “green points” in return to buy fresh food from traditional farmers. In order to facilitate this process, the metropolitan government purchases all of the Market’s vegetables at above-market prices (total monthly cost: $6,800). Local farmers warmly welcomed the initiative which improved their livelihood as well as their visibility in the community; whereas market-goers enjoy a cleaner environment in exchange for freshly sourced local vegetables. [Source: Urban NEXUS Case Story 2014 – n.16]. Learn More...

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  • Waste concern pilot project: “cash for trash” (Dhaka, Bangladesh)

    The metropolis of Dhaka currently produces 4,600 tons of solid waste per day, 80% of which is organic. The Waste Concern project is a community-based approach to managing solid wastes in a dense and fast-growing metropolis through composting. A decentralized composting unit in a neighbourhood provides a source of income for slum dwellers, reduces risks associated with poor sanitation and climate change, and produces low-cost bio-fertilizers for farmers, thereby contributing to food security and resource efficiency. The initiative is beneficial to both the urban environment and the livelihoods of waste pickers. [Source: Urban NEXUS Case Story 2014 – n.28]. Learn More...

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  • Deep Lake Water Cooling System: using Lake Ontario’s chilly waters to cool down an entire district (Toronto, Canada)

    The Deep Lake Water Cooling project sources water from Lake Ontario, which is then diverted to the Toronto financial district cooling system, before entering the water distribution network. It results in significant reduction of operating costs and greenhouse gas emissions. The system pumps fresh water through five kilometers of tubes, 83 meters below the surface of Lake Ontario. The closed-loop chilled water distribution network cools 63 buildings in the financial district, before entering the City’s potable water distribution network. On an annual basis, the system saves about 85 million kilowatt-hours, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions by about 79,000 tons, compared to conventional cooling systems. The financial savings from efficiencies are passed on to consumers in the form of 10% tariff reductions. Potable water quality in summer has also improved dramatically. Not only has this project been ecologically beneficial but also, in 2011, it made a net profit of CAD $9.3 million. [Source: Urban NEXUS Case Story 2014 – n.25]. Learn More...

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  • City of Surrey: Sustainable Waste Management (City of Surrey, Canada)

    A regionally mandated target of 70% waste diversion by 2015 and its own Sustainability Charter led City of Surrey to unveil a holistic approach to sustainable waste management (2012). Three interconnected measures were devised to close the loop on waste: a new waste collection provider with a requirement that its fleet be comprised exclusively of alternate fuel vehicles; a curbside collection system for household organic waste (Rethink Waste Collection Program); and the construction of an organic waste biofuel facility to process the collected organic waste into a vehicle grade renewable natural gas. Surrey’s Rethink Waste program resulted in the city achieving its 70% waste diversion goal for residential customers well ahead of the 2015 target. In addition, the compressed natural gas (CNG) fleet used to carry out collection services emit 23% less carbon emissions as well as 90% less air particulates than traditional diesel trucks. Due to the low cost of natural gas compared to diesel, and the switch to a cart-based collection system with an alternating service schedule, the city will realize up to $3 million savings per year on its waste collection services while significantly reducing landfill-bound garbage. [Source: Partners for Climate Protection National Measures Report 2012, page 13]. Learn More...

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  • City of Saint John: Municipal Energy Efficiency Program (MEEP) (City of Saint John, Canada)

    Upon a comprehensive energy audit on corporate buildings and their related costs, the City of Saint John initiated the Municipal Energy Efficiency Program (MEEP) in 1996. Since the program's inception, energy retrofit projects have been implemented in approximately 90 corporate buildings and facilities. Typical MEEP projects include upgrades to lighting and HVAC systems, installation of Energy Management Control System (EMCS) tools for remote monitoring of individual buildings, staff training and awareness programs, performing energy audits and feasibility studies. As of 2011, energy consumed by corporate buildings, streetlights, and water treatment facilities has been reduced by 16%, resulting in 15 million kilowatt-hours in energy savings, over $1.8 million in cost savings, and 6,300 tonnes of GHGs reduced annually. MEEP is recognized as a provincial and national best practice for its energy efficiency and conservation efforts as well as GHG emissions reductions. [Source: Partners for Climate Protection National Measures Report 2012, page 12]. Learn More...

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  • North Vancouver Lonsdale Energy Corporation (North Vancouver, Canada)

    The City of North Vancouver established the Lonsdale Energy Corporation (LEC) in 2003. The corporation was designed to create a district energy system that would heat and supply domestic hot water to residential, municipal and commercial buildings. A feasibility study conducted in 2002 found that a central energy plant would be more efficient to provide heat and hot water locally. LEC is a key component of the city’s local action plan. The entire LEC system serves a network of 22 buildings, including 1,785 residential units. These buildings used to be heated using inefficient electric baseboards. Eliminating this fossil-fuel generated electricity has reduced nitrous oxide emissions by 64% and CO2 emissions by 21%. [Source: Partners for Climate Protection Greenhouse Gas Reduction Initiative of the Month December 2010, Federation of Canadian Municipalities and ICLEI Canada] . Learn More...

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  • The Nørrebrogade Project: revitalizing a major road corridor for enhanced public transport and urban life (Copenhagen, Denmark)

    Copenhagen is a renowned cycling city. Yet despite its considerable cycling culture, as of less than a decade ago, major thoroughfares such as the Nørrebrogade road were heavily congested with traffic from private vehicles. A two-stage project to revitalize a major transportation corridor increased cycling and public transportation ridership, while reducing private automobile use by 50 percent in the area. This Case Story examines the traffic trial measures, as a model of Travel Demand Management (TDM). It focuses on the application of an innovative multi-staged process designed to test the usability and public acceptance of a series of transport development interventions. These interventions were designed to reduce private vehicle use, and vitalize public transport, non-motorized modes, and the use of Nørrebrogade’s public space.. Learn More...

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  • Integrated Waste Management in Greater Porto (Porto, Portugal)

    The Intermunicipal Waste Management of Greater Porto (LIPOR), created in 1982, serves 8 Municipalities and a population of 985.000 inhabitants, with a Municipal Waste Production of 471,861.31 t (2013), corresponding to 1.3 kg/inhab/day. The waste management system implemented, following the 3Rs hierarchy, includes material recycling, composting, waste-to-energy (waste incineration with electricity recovery), and finally waste disposal in sanitary landfill. While the Country’s average is 46% material and energy recovery and 54% waste disposal, in the area covered by LIPOR 99% of the waste is recovered for materials and energy and only less than 1% is disposed of in landfill. In 2013, the local electricity production exported to the power grid (153,174MWh) was equivalent to the domestic consumption of 150.000 citizens, i.e. 15% of population served by Lipor, with a partially renewable energy resource. In addition, 5,535t of scrap metal were recovered and 69,535 t of CO2 emissions were avoided. The landfill and waste to energy sites have a monitoring program which includes environmental, public health and psychosocial component. [Source: “Local Energy from Local Waste”, LIPOR, Aires Pereira, Chairman, 7th CEWEP Congress 2014, in Brussels] . Learn More...

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  • Waste to fuel: biogas powered buses in Lille Metropole (Lille Metropole, France)

    The metropolitan region of Lille has been a pioneer in sustainable waste-to-energy practices since the 1990s and the initiative is still expanding. Today the entire city fleet is fueled with biomethane, a local renewable energy resource, produced from organic waste. At the same time, local agriculture benefits from organic fertilizers produced from the residues of the waste’s biodigestion. In 1990, the City of Lille installed a pilot scrubbing unit in Lille’s Marquette Water Treatment Plant to recover the surplus biogas produced by the digestion of sewage sludge. As a result, 3000m³ per day of gas which was previously burned through the plant's flares was converted into bio-methane per day and used to power four buses between 1994 and 2004. Additionally, half of the bus fleet was replaced with natural gas vehicles (NGVs), as the 1999 Mobility Plan facilitated the use of gas-powered vehicles for environmental reasons, and two recycling centers were set up to manage the growing waste generation. More recently, the Metropolitan Region of Lille has equipped restaurants and hotels with macerators that collect and prepare gastronomical organic waste that is then collected and brought to the plant. [Source: Urban NEXUS Case Study 2014 – n.7]. Learn More...

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  • Moving towards an integrated model for efficient water management in Lima (Lima, Peru)

    To address the vulnerability of its water supply to the present-and-future effects of pollution and climate change, Lima Metropolitan Area is strengthening its water governance through the creation of the interregional Water Resource Council for three river basins. The Council will form a single, participatory water management authority to investigate, implement, and finance integrated solutions for the three watersheds. [Source: ICLEI Case Study series n. 180]. Learn More...

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  • Biogas powers public transport in Linköping (Linköping, Sweden)

    The Linköping project is a successful example of the use of organic waste as raw material for the production of bio-methane to fuel public and private transport vehicles and generate bio-fertilizer. The Linköping plant was initiated in 1996 to treat organic waste from agriculture and slaughterhouses around Linköping. Financed by the local government, the plant currently processes about 45,000 tons of waste per year and fuels the City’s 89 buses and over one thousand private vehicles. Over the past few years, the plant has undergone several upgrades to increase its capacity to match the growing demand for biogas, a local renewable energy resource. Additionally, the plant supports local produce through the production of 52,000 tons/year of bio-fertilizer for farms in the region. In 2001, the project was expanded to include waste from school canteens and restaurants. [Source: Urban NEXUS Case Story 2014 – n.14]. Learn More...

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  • Regional District of Nanaimo (RDN): Pollution Control Centre (Regional District of Nanaimo, Canada)

    The Greater Nanaimo Pollution Control Centre (GNPCC) is a mid-sized wastewater treatment facility serving approximately 85,600 residents relying on anaerobic digestion to break down and stabilize the sludge from residential wastewater and generate biogas, a local renewable energy resource. Initially a portion of this biogas was used to heat buildings. However, up to 60% of the biogas generated used to be flared, squandering the energy-generation potential. In 2010, the RDN decided to construct a 330 kW cogeneration facility to use nearly all of the biogas production and generate both heat and electricity, meeting the heating demands of the wastewater facility. The first of its size at a wastewater treatment facility in British Columbia, the system was sized to produce approximately 2,000,000 kWh of electricity per year, corresponding to $200,000 in annual cost savings, and reducing annual GHG emissions by 50 tonnes. These electricity savings help to provide for the electricity demand on Vancouver Island, prolonging the life of the aging submarine transmission cables that bring electricity to the island and contributing to aspirations for local energy self-sufficiency. [Source: Partners for Climate Protection National Measures Report 2011, page 9]. Learn More...

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  • Solar heaters in low income housing: Energy and financial savings (Betim, Brazil)

    Through an initiative of the City of Betim, 1,356 Solar water heaters were installed in low income housing (2004-2007). A survey on these households, conducted 2-5 years after equipment installation, confirmed the social and environmental benefits. [Source: ICLEI Case Study series n. 112]. Learn More...

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  • Curitiba Ecoelétrico: moving towards intelligent electric urban mobility (Curitiba, Brazil)

    Curitiba Ecoelétrico is a pioneering project in Brazil which can potentially inspire other Latin American cities with access to renewable energy sources to invest in electric mobility infrastructure. With the completion of the first phase of the project in 2015, Curitiba will have a municipal fleet of vehicles using low-carbon energy from the Itaipu hydroelectric plant. This project, the first of its kind by any municipality in Brazil, will be integrated into Curitiba’s existing transport infrastructure (which includes BRT, bike paths, and a soon-to-be operational subway system), and is motivated by Curitiba’s desire to effectively manage traffic and avoid long journeys. [source: ICLEI Case Study n.178]. Learn More...

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  • Reviving the Soul in Seoul: Seoul's Experience in Demolishing Road Infrastructure and Improving Public Transport (Seoul, Republic of Korea)

    The experience of Seoul in demolishing an existing elevated highway and the approach that Seoul took in tackling its problems with traffic congestion provides a good counterargument to the “predict and provide” urban planning approach to transportation. An expressway over the Chenggyecheong stream was installed in the 1960’s to provide space for increasing automobile traffic; by the early 2000s, the foundations of the expressway were corroded and would require a great deal of repair. Despite the seeming functionality of the expressway, Seoul Municipal Government decided to dismantle it and turn Chenggyecheong into a park and public space with bridges for pedestrians and cars connecting the two banks. Around the same time period as the Chengggyecheong Restoration, Seoul also restructured its bus system and to be more efficient. These two projects together show that focusing on making cities people-friendly and improving public transportation, particularly bus systems, are sounder responses to traffic congestion than attempting to expand a city’s capacity to accommodate personal motorized transport. [Source: Sustainable Urban Transport Project, GIZ]. Learn More...

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  • Local Government Regulation Ordinances and Laws to Promote Renewable Energy (São Paulo, Brazil)

    The Solar Ordinance of Sao Paulo requires new residential, commercial and industrial buildings to install solar water heating systems (SWH) to cover at least 40% of the energy used for heating water. The Ordinance has stimulated market demand for an innovative RE technology and resulted in significant net savings among a wide array of stakeholders and a reduction in the production costs of SWH. By 2015, it will allow for a reduction of around 35,000 tonnes carbon dioxide equivalent from the city’s residential sector and 200 gigawatt hours in electricity consumption. It is currently being replicated in cities across Brazil.. Learn More...

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  • A new approach to solid waste management in Medellín: matching problems with solutions (Medellín, Colombia)

    Over the last ten years, the City of Medellín has achieved numerous improvements in solid waste management system. A major contributor to this success has been the implementation of educational programs, regulatory actions, and tools for integrated solid waste management, with an emphasis on enhancing the recognition and social inclusion of waste collectors. Results: there was a 13.5 percent increase in solid waste recovery and the prevention of 665 tons of waste being sent to the La Pradera landfill and further consolidated participation and support for improved solid waste management in Medellín. [Source: ICLEI Case Study n. 179]. Learn More...

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  • IntegraBike: Pedaling towards sustainable urban development (Sorocaba, Brazil)

    With over 100 km of bicycle paths, Sorocaba is a national reference point for excellence in urban mobility. Its successful free bike sharing program, IntegraBike, not only promotes the integration between transport modes, but has also improved the quality of life among Sorocaba’s citizens, and contributes to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. The program has been an immediate success in the city; during its first month in existence, there were 6,000 bicycle leases. This number has risen steadily: following its second year of operation, the IntegraBike program accounted for 231,500 bicycle leases, therein establishing the city as a national reference point, and inspiring similar projects in other cities. This has been made possible through a decade of focused transportation planning in Sorocaba. [Source: ICLEI Case Study n. 184] . Learn More...

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  • Certification standards for fighting climate change: the “Sustainable BH” Seal (Belo Horizonte, Brazil)

    The Belo Horizonte City Council instituted the “Sustainable BH” Seal, a voluntary environmental certification program that recognizes environmentally high-performing projects which will help the city reduce its GHG emissions. In the three years since it has been introduced, the Sustainable BH Seal has certified 50 projects including: hotels; residential and commercial buildings; restaurants; schools; a football stadium which was used in the 2014 World Cup; a landfill; and a municipal vehicle fleet. According to estimates by the Municipal Committee on Climate Change and Eco-efficiency (MCCCE), the potential release of 690,000 tons of CO2eq and the consumption of 160,000 MWh of energy and of 160,000 m3 of water have been avoided on account of Sustainable BH certified projects. [Source: ICLEI Case Study n. 185]. Learn More...

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  • Doornkop Community Solar Solutions (Steve Tshwete, South Africa)

    This showcase project focuses on a community centre that had no access to grid electricity. Through the installation of renewable energy options the centre now functions more effectively and the whole community benefits. A variety of different renewable energy and energy efficiency solutions were implemented at the Doornkop local community centre. This included an 18kWp solar PV array, solar water heaters, solar street lights, ceilings insulation and some small scale energy saving items. The importance of community participation and awareness was recognised, which led to the hosting of a renewable energy expo and workshops emphasizing on-the-job training. [Source: ICLEI Case Study n. 187]. Learn More...

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  • Using Technology for Smarter Parking Management (San Francisco, USA)

    SFpark aims to ensure one available parking spot per block by providing real-time parking availability data to drivers and using demand-response pricing to encourage people to park in underutilized space. This innovative approach helps reduce traffic congestion, increase circulation and mobility, and decrease air pollution from cars cruising for parking. Preliminary program results reveal a 29% increase in meter revenue and a 35% decrease in parking citations. This innovative solution demonstrates how a local government can tackle parking problems, while maintaining revenue and providing safer and healthier streets for the community. [Source: ICLEI Case Study n. 162]. Learn More...

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  • Building a plan to transform non-motorized transport in Bogotá (Bogotá, Colombia)

    In recent years Bogotá has experienced a profound transformation towards non-motorized transport (NMT) in its infrastructure planning and policies. This case study provides background information on how these policies were implemented, what obstacles were identified, how they were overcome and which lessons can be learned. Bicycle-related developments in the city (e.g. the establishment of 350+ km of bike paths) have increased citizens’ access to goods and services, reduced their travel times and improved their perception of their travel mode; bicycle use has increased from, 0.6% in 1996 to circa 5% in 2006. [Source: ICLEI Case Study n. 165]. Learn More...

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  • Recovering energy from biogas produced in wastewater treatment plants (Almada, Portugal)

    The Portinho da Costa Wastewater Treatment Plant recovers electricity and heat from the biogas generated through sludge treatment. The use of biogas for cogeneration enables operational cost savings through the displacement of natural gas and grid electricity consumption, which in 2011 amounted to 55,322 Euros. When the plant operation reaches full capacity the potential for savings corresponds to 46% of electricity and 96% of natural gas in comparison with the scenario in the absence of biogas recovery. The potential greenhouse gas emissions reduction is 687 t CO2/year. [Source: ICLEI Case Study n. 189]. Learn More...

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  • A model for Transit Oriented Development (Curitiba, Brazil)

    In the mid-1960s, to keep pace with Curitiba’s surge in population, traffic congestion, and uncontrolled urban sprawl, the City shifted its urban planning strategy to Transit Oriented Development (TOD) and with this substantially reduced its carbon footprint, while boosting the quality of urban life. The result of Curitiba’s approach to TOD is one of the most sophisticated low-cost, high-capacity public transit networks to date. TOD improved Curitiba’s low-emission, sustainable mobility; reduced travel times and private vehicle use. The BRT is used by 85 percent of Curitiba’s population. Curitiba’s TOD supported resource-efficient and long-term investments in urban infrastructure in the development corridors, as opposed to Brazilian cities in similar positions, who invested solely in bus systems.. Learn More...

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  • District Energy in Cities: Paris Case Study (Paris, France)

    The City of Paris has extensive experience with district heating that dates back to the beginning of the nineteen century. Since 1991, the city also has district cooling in operation through a concession to Climespace. The district cooling network is very innovative and was the first cooling network in Europe. The district cooling network makes use of the Seine River %u201Cfree cooling%u201D to pre-cool water before it enters electric chillers. This free cooling is used as the baseload supply of the network, meeting 75% of the network%u2019s cooling demand over a year. This way electricity consumption of the electric chillers is much lower, improving costs, energy efficiency and reducing CO2 emissions. In addition Climespace runs about 60% of the piping network through the city%u2019s sewage system thus minimizing construction works costs and nuisance to the Parisians. [Source: UNEP, 2015]. Learn More...

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